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This is the latest article in a series about how to drive authentic, equitable, and sustainable learning by decisions that empower learnership. In other words, the more students know about their learning, the more opportunity they have to own their learning which leads to increased student achievement. Elevated Achievement’s Learning Model is the tool teachers need to support students in ownership of their learning, thereby developing learnership.

In previous articles of this series, we provided an overview of the Learning Model and its five student-centered phases: setting the Learning Context, stating the Learning Outcome, engaging in the Learning Process, producing the Learning Demonstration, and implementing the Learning Application. We also discussed the sequence of “backwards” planning a focused lesson and provided examples. Our most recent articles focused on the phases where teachers set the Learning Context and implement the Learning Application.

Now we will take an in-depth look at the next phase in the “backwards” planning sequence, the Learning Outcome.

Determining the Learning Outcome

This is the phase of the lesson during which students specifically understand what they will be learning and how they will show they have learned it. During this phase, the teacher explains WHAT the students will be learning (the skill of the standard) and HOW they will SHOW that they have learned (a demonstration or product). Students will struggle with the learning if they are not clear on how to answer the question, “What will I learn?”

While stating the Learning Outcome, the learning can be written in a variety of ways—as a learning intention with success criteria, as a learning goal, as an objective, or as one part of a larger unit. The learning outcome should be stated, written, discussed, or addressed as determined by student needs. Students will have the opportunity to produce or demonstrate the learning of this outcome during the Learning Demonstration phase.

The Value to Students

If students know what they are learning they are more able to…

  • Understand and articulate what specific skill or content they will be learning during the lesson.
  • Connect this lesson’s learning with previous learning and an identified future application.
  • Understand and articulate how they will know that they have learned, via a demonstration or product, by the end of the lesson.

The Value to Teachers

Teachers who have a classroom full of students who can articulate what they are learning will have students that….

  • Make connections from previous learning to the lesson outcome and how together this will support them in future learning and application.
  • Take ownership of where they are in learning the skill or content during the lesson and can articulate what differentiated or additional supports they may need to meet the identified learning demonstration.
  • Buy-in to their learning as they see value and progress in meeting the identified learning demonstration of the lesson.

In other words, the value to you is to have a classroom of learners who will help you with the task of teaching. Instead of just one person monitoring all of the learning, you will have a roomful of people.

To help you make stronger student-centered decisions, consider these questions as you plan:

  • What skill will the students learn?
  • What will the students do to show that they have learned this skill?
  • How will you share this information with your students?

Click here to download a lesson planning template to use as you determine the Learning Outcome for your next lesson.

What’s Next in Learnership?

As we’ve said before, teachers play a crucial role in ensuring that students own their learning. The teacher is the key decision-maker for establishing effective learning designs before, during, and after instruction in the classroom. Because the teacher is the person who knows the most about the students, it is important that the teacher’s ownership in making these decisions is cultivated.

That’s why we are providing 5 articles that take in-depth looks at the each of the phases of the Learning Model, their value to students, and their value to teachers. In each article, you will get the planning questions and tools you need to implement focused Learning Models for each and every lesson.

Remember, the decision-making sequence for designing a lesson is “backwards.” Therefore, the following sequence for reading is recommended as you plan with a focused Learning Model.

Then you’ll be ready to backwards plan a lesson and forward instruct through that lesson with the end in mind as you move through the five student-centered phases: setting the Learning Context, stating the Learning Outcome, engaging in the Learning Process, producing the Learning Demonstration, and implementing the Learning Application.

The Learning Brief

In this article you learned…
  • The Learning Outcome is the phase of the lesson during which students specifically understand what they will be learning and how they will show they have learned it.
  • The learning outcome should be stated, written, discussed, or addressed as determined by student needs, and students will have the opportunity to produce or demonstrate the learning of this outcome during the Learning Demonstration
  • Teachers who have a classroom full of students who can articulate what skill they are learning will have students that buy-in to their learning as they see value and progress in meeting the identified learning demonstration of the lesson.
Reading Time: 6 minutes

Can you imagine building an environment full of motivated, engaged, and eager students who own their learning?
We can.

Let us show you how

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